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AD 43
50
52
60
80
90+
Romans invade and conquer Britain
Romans found Londinium
First Roman timber bridge is built.
Boudicca, Queen of the Iceni, burns Londonium to the ground
Romans rebuild Londinium and the timber bridge
Earliest date for building of permanent bridge
100 100
102
196
Londinium with a bridge, becomes capital of Roman province of Britain.
Forum/basilica built with a permanent bridge built or in place
Some Roman legions withdrawn
200 208
259
287
Visit of Emperor Septimus Severus
Temporary independent "Gallic Empire" set up, including Britain
Carausius proclaims an independent Britain
300 306
367
369
Constantine proclaimed Roman Emperor in Britain
Combined attack on Britain by Picts, Scots and Saxons
Theodosius restores order in Britain
400

407

410
467

Romans abandon London. Last legions withdrawn
Bridge likely to be no longer in use or already officially dismantled
Sack of Rome. Emperor tells Britons to arrange for their own defence
Last appeal to Rome for help from Britain - London largely abandoned
500 500+
597
"Dark Ages", with much of Britain already taken over by the Saxons
St Augustine lands in Kent to re-establish Christianity
600 600+
604
London area and Southwark bank rely on ferry for connection
Bishop of London appointed for a short period
700 730
793
London - "A mart of many peoples coming by land and sea" - Bede
Viking attacks on Britain start
800 842

872 886
Inhabitants from the The Anglo-Saxon settlement known as "Lundenwic" move into old walled area for safety. Earliest date for the rebuilding of a London Bridge
London occupied by the Vikings
King Alfred recaptures London from the Danes and restores the town
900 979
984
994
Reference to a bridge at London in Billingsgate toll records
Reference to a miscreant being thrown from London Bridge
Viking battle recorded at the bridge with attacking Danish King, Svein
1000 1000
1009
1014

1016
1066
1087
1097
Tolls recorded as being collected at London Bridge
London mentioned in Anglo-Saxon Chronicles on Norse raiding parties
To regain his capital from King Canute, Aethelred is aided by King Olaf
who pulls down London Bridge - London Bridge is Broken/Falling Down
Canute digs a ditch round London Bridge to defeat Edmund upstream
Battle of Hastings brings William the Conqueror to London
William Rufus, son of William the Conqueror rebuilds London Bridge
London Bridge carried away by floods. Local forced labour used to rebuild it
1100 1122
1135
1163
1176

1189+
London Bridge recorded as possessing revenue producing lands
London and the bridge destroyed in major fire. All then rebuilt
Last wooden bridge built under direction of Peter De Colechurch
Peter de Colechurch starts to build the stone London Bridge
Henry II imposes a tax on wool for its construction
Richard the Lionheart's war costs delay the completion of the bridge
King John gives land to the City to produce more revenues for the bridge
1200 1201
1205
1209
1212
1216
1243
1249
1252
1257
1258
1263

1265
1267
1269
1270
1281

1282
King John decrees that houses should be erected on the bridge for rent
Peter de Colechurch dies and is buried in the new crypt of the bridge chapel
London Bridge is completed with the gates, chapel and houses
Major fire in Southwark destroys southern houses on the bridge
Louis, Dauphin of France crosses the bridge as guests of the Barons
First mention of Bridge House as the administrative centre for the bridge
Henry III takes over the bridge's revenue to pay for his wars
Henry gives grant of protection to the Brethren of the Bridge for funds
First mention of the drawbridge
City establishes its control over the whole length of the bridge
Unpopular Queen Eleanor's barge pelted by citizens on the bridge
Simon de Montfort occupies Southwark. Drawbridge raised against him
Bridge funds administered by Brethren of the Chapel of St Thomas
Earl of Gloucester occupies Southwark, and gains the City and its gates
King Henry again grants Queen Eleanor custody of the bridge
Bridge collapsing from lack of repair as Queen Eleanor misuses funds
Edward I gives back control of the bridge to the City
Five arches of the bridge collapse in winter. London Bridge is Falling Down
Edward appoints Bridge Wardens and gives the bridge a charter and tolls
1300 1305
1309
1348
1357
1358
1381
1384+
1388
1390
First head displayed on the bridge, that of William Wallace
Bridge damaged by heavy ice on the Thames
Black Death kills many in London
Edward, the Black Prince crosses bridge with captive, Jean II of France
Bridge Wardens accounts record 138 rent-paying shops on the bridge
Wat Tyler leads Peasant's Revolt. Tyler slain and head placed on the bridge
Structure of London Bridge rebuilt over 13 years including a new chapel
New drawbridge constructed
Joust on the bridge between Lord Welles and Sir David de Lindsay
1400 1415
1421
1425
1426+
1437
1442
1445
1450

1460+
1463
1485

1497
Henry V, victor of Agincourt crosses the bridge with captive Duke of Orleans
Henry V received on bridge with his new Queen, Catherine of France
One of the arches cracks. Iron-shod carts banned from bridge
New Drawbridge Gate is built
Great Stone Gate collapses with two arches. Extensive bridge repairs follow
A new drawbridge is begun
Reception on bridge for bride of Henry VI, Margaret of Anjou.
Jack Cade rebels fight on the bridge and part of it is burned
Rebels defeated and Jack Cade's head placed on the bridge
Start of bridge being totally rebuilt arch-by-arch over 30 years
Common Council orders drawbridge to be raised for all ships
Kent uprising sets fire to new Great Stone Gate and 13 houses
Uprising defeated and leader, Thomas Fauconberg's head placed on bridge
Common Council allows decayed drawbridge to be raised only in defence
Hydraulic water pumps first installed on bridge to provide drinking water
1500 1500
1501
1509
1530
1535
1538
1539
1549
1553
1554
1577

1580

1582
1588
1591
1594
First picture of London Bridge painted as part of Duke of Orleans manuscript
Reception for Catherine of Aragon, bride of Arthur, elder brother of Henry VIII
Funeral procession along the bridge for Henry VII
Statute of Bridges introduced for repair of all bridges throughout the kingdom
Henry VIII has Thomas More's/Bishop Fisher's head placed on the bridge
Henry VIII orders chapel to cease to be dedicated to Thomas a Becket
Chapel images of Thomas a Becket painted over. Becomes Lady Chapel
Chapel defaced inside and ordered to be changed into a "dwelling house"
Chapel is turned into a shop and residence, then into a warehouse
Sir Thomas Wyatt's rebellion over Queen Mary's betrothal to Philip of Spain
Demolition of the Drawbridge Gate begins, making way for Nonesuch House
"House of Many Windows" also built towards southern end
City agrees to Peter Morris installing waterworks at northern end to pump
water into the City
Law passed limiting shop counters on the bridge to project only 4" (100mm)
Spanish Armada defeated. Captured banners displayed on Great Stone Gate
Corn mills erected at Southwark end of bridge
Van den Wyngaerde's detailed view of London Bridge published
1600 1605

1616
1624
1633
1639
1641

1645+
1647

1666
1672
1676
1678
1683
1684
1685
Guy Fawkes and fellow plotters' heads placed on the bridge after the Gunpowder Plot
to blow up Parliament
Visscher's view of London Bridge published
John Norden's view of London Bridge published
Fire at City end destroys a third of houses at that end of the bridge
One house at the City end rebuilt
Royal Barge of Queen Henrietta overturns while "shooting the bridge". Queen's Lady of Bedchamber drowns
A complete new block built at the City end
In Civil War, gates of London Bridge opened to Cromwell's New Model Army who march with General Fairfax into London.
Great Fire of London consumes City end block and waterwheels but spares most of the bridge
Fixed Drawbridge rebuilt
Serious fire in Southwark
William Stayley is last head to be displayed on the bridge
Destroyed houses at City end of bridge rebuilt
Famous "Frost Fair" held on the frozen Thames. Visited by Charles II
Many houses taken down and rebuilt to widen street to 20ft, (6m), except those adjoining the old Nonesuch House where gateway height is increased
1700 1722

1725

1727+
1745

1750
1751+

1756
1757+
1757
1758
1759


1761

1762
1763
1779
1782
1786+
1799
Lord Mayor orders bridge traffic to kept to the left. Tolls introduced.
Fixed drawbridge rebuilt again
Fire destroys all the Southwark end houses over the first two arches including the Great Stone Gate.
Great Stone Gate demolished. Roadway widened to 18ft (5.5m)
Five waterwheels working. New block by George Dance, at the City end, the last houses to be built on the bridge
Westminster bridge opens, the first of other new bridges over the Thames
Stationers occupy the remains of the old chapel in the encasing building, called Chapel House, with paper stored in the old undercroft
Act of Parliament authorises the removal of all the houses on the bridge
Demolition of the houses starts
Temporary wooden bridge erected alongside. Nonesuch House pulled down
Temporary wooden bridge burnt down
New "Great Arch" formed in bridge by complete removal of a central pier. Bridge renewed with widening to 46ft (14m), with new end arches and decorative piers, balustrades and alcoves for pedestrians
Great Stone Gate demolished.The Royal Coat of Arms from it is rebuilt into the public house in Newcomen Street
Last house tenacy on bridge expires and all houses fully cleared
New footway at City end opened though tower of St Magnus-the-Martyr
Rebuilt Waterworks at City end burnt
Bridge Tolls abolished and traffic increases
Waterwheels and pumps rebuilt
London Bridge fully measured and accurately drawn for the first time by George Dance the Younger
1800 1800
1813
1817
1819
1821

1822
1823
1824

1825
1827
1831
1832

1839

1858
1873
1879
1894
First proposals for a new bridge put forward
Heavy ice on Thames. Bridge damaged. Last Frost Fair
John Rennie's Waterloo Bridge opens
John Rennie's Southwark Bridge opens
Committee for New Bridge set up and competition organised. Results overuled and a design by John Rennie selected
Act passed to remove the old bridge's waterwheels
Royal Assent for Act for the Rebuilding of London Bridge
15th March - First piles driven for coffer dam(s) for construction of Sir John Rennie's new London Bridge
15th June - Foundation Stone laid in presence of Duke of York
4th August - First arch on Southwark side completed
1st August - Bridge officially opened by William IV and Queen Adelaide
During demolition of old bridge, Peter de Colechurch's bones found in old chapel undercroft . Presumably destroyed with the rest
London Bridge Station first opens and railway use growth starts with the first "commuters" using the bridge to go over to the City
Chelsea Bridge opens
Albert Bridge opens
Lambeth Bridge opens
Tower Bridge opens
1900 1902
1940+
1967
1967+

1968+

1971

1973
1996
Bridge is widened with corbels and new balustrade
London Bridge goes through WWII without damage
Corporation of London is empowered by London Bridge Act to build a new London Bridge
Sir John Rennie's bridge dismantled and replaced section-by-section with a new concrete structure
Old bridge sold to the McCulloch Oil Corporation and transported in parts to Arizona to be rebuilt at Lake Havasu City. Foundation stone laid of the re-constructed bridge
Sir John Rennie's bridge completely re-assembled at Lake Havasu City and officially opened by Lord Mayor
New London Bridge officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II
Museum on the history of London Bridge first proposed
2000 2000
2001
2006
2009

2012
London Bridge Museum & Education Trust formed
Trust educational website first goes out over the internet
Initial educational material completed as brochures, posters, DVD-Rom, lecture CD
Scheduled date for the opening of proto-London Bridge Museum, the 800th Anniversary of the Peter de Colechurch bridge in 1209
Intended opening of the full London Bridge Museum , the year of the Olympic Games in London

Time-line entries adapted from those recorded in Peter Jackson's book, "London Bridge - A Visual History", ISBN 0-948667-82-6, and
Pat Pierce's book, "Old London Bridge", ISBN 0-7472-3493-0.

© London Bridge Museum & Educational Trust